June 4, 2014

List of A- Z Vitamins and their Values

1. VITAMIN A - (retinyl palmitate, beta-carotene, lutein, lycopene, mixed carotenoids)

DESCRIPTION: Without Vitamin A it is impossible for the body to use proteins? Do you know what this means? It means forget about utilizing protein unless you have Vitamina A. This vitamin is an antioxidant as well as a fat-soluble nutrient. So, it can be dissolved in fat. When we eat food that contains beta-carotene, it is then converted to Vitamin A in the liver. If you aren't that crazy about foods that contain Vitamin A, you might want to take a high-quality multivitamin which should provide vitamin A (fat soluble) in the form of retinyl palmitate; and mixed carotenoids (water soluble). These are the building blocks your body uses to make vitamin A. You might see carotenoids appearing on labels as alpha- and gamma-carotene, beta-carotene, cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene, and zeaxanthin. (Who made up these names?) Though overdosing on Vitamin A is unlikely, the skin could quite possibly turn a slight yellow-orange with a hefty intake.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Helps support bone formation and cell membranes. It's important to support the eyes, hair, skin (such as acne) and teeth. In other words, Vitamin A stimulates growth and vitality. It helps form the color purple which is essential for night vision. It's great for immune system functions - like fighting infection, colds, flu and bacteria. It also helps maintain the healthy function of the reproductive organs and liver function. When there is tissue damage inside or outside the body, a broken bone or damaged skin - it's Vitamin A to the rescue. It speeds up healing time in many illnesses. Vitamin A is an antioxidant, therefore, it helps the body combat environmental pollutants.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: Antibiotics, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and some laxatives can interfere with the absorption of Vitamin A. Those individuals who are pregnant or have liver disease MUST consult with their physician. Children MUST be directed by their physician. Hypothyroid individuals and diabetics should avoid beta-carotene because they cannot convert it to Vitamin A.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: None if taken as recommended.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa sprouts, apricots, asparagus, avocado, banana, bee pollen, beets, broccoli, cabbage, cantaloupe, carrots, cayenne pepper, celery, cherries, dandelion greens, fish liver oils, garlic, kale, kelp, leaf lettuce, liver, melon, mustard, papaya, parsley, peaches, peas, persimmon, pineapple, prunes, pumpkin, spinach, spirulina, sweet potatoes, yellow fruits and squash, tomato, yellow or green vegetables, sprouted wheat, turnip greens, whole wheat, wheatgrass, and watercress.

2. BIOTIN - (B-Complex Vitamin)

DESCRIPTION: Biotin is a sulfur-containing, B-complex vitamin found in foods and produced by microorganisms in the lower gastrointestinal tract. Biotin activates certain enzymes that aid in metabolism of carbon dioxide, and is involved in the metabolism of Vitamin B12, folic acid, pantothenic acid, B- complex vitamins, protein, fats and carbohydrates. Essential in the formation of RNA and DNA. Biotin can be produced in the intestines from food, so a deficiency is rare.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Supports energy production and healthy hair and skin. May help promote healthy bone marrow, cell growth, nerve tissue, sweat glands and may help relieve muscle pain. Helps the liver produce fats (lipids) and helps convert food into energy. Aids in exhaustion and preventing baldness. Sufficient quantities are needed for healthy skin.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None known when taken as directed.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: Sulfa and antibiotics may lower biotin levels in the body.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa sprouts, banana, beans, bee pollen, barley, Brewer's yeast, cauliflower, cooked egg yolks, corn, fruits, meat, milk, nutritional yeast, nuts, okra, peanuts, poultry, brown rice, saltwater fish, seeds, soybeans, spirulina, strawberries, green vegetables, walnuts, wheatgerm, wheatgrass, whole grains and fortified cereals.

3. VITAMIN B1 - (thiamine)

DESCRIPTION: Vitamin B1 is a water-soluble nutrient that is not stored in the body and has to be replenished every day. It is not so easily destroyed by normal cooking temperatures. It is found widely in animal and plant tissues but rarely in high concentrations, except in brewer's yeast.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Promotes neurotransmission involved in memory and learning. Its roles include carbohydrate metabolism, maintenance of normal digestion and the appetite, and it is essential for normal function of the nervous, muscular and cardiovascular system. It also provides a certain amount of energy. It may be helpful for fertility and lactation.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None if taken as recommended.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: Should be taken with or as part of a B-complex vitamin.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily, and may be consumed and used up by antibiotics.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa sprouts, almonds, asparagus, avocado, barley, bee pollen, Brewer's yeast, broccoli, brussel sprouts, chickpeas, dates, egg yolks, figs, fish, flour, garlic, kelp, kidney beans, lentils, liver or organ meats, navy beans, oatmeal, onion, oranges, parsley, peanuts, peas, pecans, plums, pork, dried prunes, raisins, wild rice, rice bran, salmon, seeds, soybeans, spirulina and sunflower seeds, green vegetables, watercress, wheat germ, whole grain cereals, and wheatgrass.

4. VITAMIN B2 - (riboflavin)

DESCRIPTION: This vitamin is a water and alcohol soluble micronutrient. Vitamin B2 aids in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. It is unstable in light and not destroyed by heat in cooking unless with alkali.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: It is important in the formation of certain enzymes and natural growth and reproduction. It also participates in our adaptation to light. Helps support vision and cellular respiration. Promotes energy production and healthy red blood cell formation. It also aids in the maintenance of healthy skin, nails and hair growth. It may be helpful in stressful situations.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None if taken as recommended.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: None when used as directed.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa sprouts, almonds, apples, apricots, asparagus, avocado, banana, beans, bee pollen, brewer's yeast, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cashews, cheese, cherries, chicken, currants, dates, eggs, figs, fish, garlic, grains, green vegetables, kelp, liver, meat, milk, nutritional yeast, nuts, onion, organ meats, parsley, poultry, prunes, rose hips, seeds, spinach, spirulina, sprouts of kinds, watercress, wheat germ, wheatgrass, wild rice, and yogurt.

5. VITAMIN B3 - (niacin, niacinamide)

DESCRIPTION: Vitamin B3 is available in two basic forms -- niacin (also called nicotinic acid) and niacinamide (also called nicatinamide). It is important in tissue respiration and fat synthesis. It aids in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Vitamin B3 is not destroyed in ordinary cooking or destroyed by heat, light, air or alkali. It is soluable in hot water and alcohol.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Helps support your cardiovascular and circulatory systems, and reduces serum cholesterol. Promotes healthy blood fat levels, healthy skin, digestive system and tongue. Has to be present in the production of cortisone, thyroxin, insulin and the male and female sex hormones. We utilize it for a healthy nervous system and brain function. Deficiencies could cause gastrointestinal and mental disturbances such as schizophrenia.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: Niacin (nicotinic acid) may cause vasodilation and flushing.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: High amounts of vitamin B3 should be used with caution and especially with a physician's approval by anyone who is pregnant or diabetic.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa, almonds, apricots, asparagus, avocado, banana, bee pollen, beef, Bread (fortified), broccoli, burdock root, carrots, cauliflower, cereal, cheese, chamomile, chicken (white meat), corn, cornflower, dates, eggs, figs, fish, garlic, grains, halibut, kelp, raw honey, legumes, milk, mushrooms, nutritional yeast, nuts, oats, onion, oranges, parsley, peanuts, peas, pork, potato, prunes, brown and wild rice, royal jelly, salmon, seeds, soybeans, spirulina, all kinds of sprouts, sunflower seeds, swordfish, tomato, tuna, turkey, green vegetables, veal, walnuts, wheatgrass, whole wheat and yeast.

6. VITAMIN B5 - (pantothenic acid)

DESCRIPTION: This water-soluble vitamin cannot be stored in the body and needs to be replenished every day. Pantothenic acid can be found in both plant and animal sources, which is why it was named after the Greek word "pantos", which means "everywhere." Vitamin B5 is destroyed by heat. Produced in the body by the benefical flora we already have in our intestines.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Helps support energy production, cellular building that may be injured during radiation and maintaining normal growth. Assists you in handling stressful situations more easily. Helps convert food into energy and stimulates the immune system and healing wounds. Promotes sharper memory and better concentration. Aids in the central nervous system. And is extremely important for the proper functioning of the adrenal glands. It also increases longetivity. Helps with the gastrointestinal system and has been thought to help with those who suffer from depression.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None known when taken as directed..

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: None known.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa, almonds, avocado, beans, beef, bee pollen, blue cheese, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, corn, eggs, grains, legumes, liver, lobster, mother's milk, mushrooms, nutritional yeast, nuts, oats, onions, oranges, peanuts, peas, pork, potato, raw honey, royal jelly, salt water fish, seeds, soybeans, spirulina, sprouts, sunflower seeds, tomato, fresh vegetables, green vegetables, walnuts, wheatgerm, wheatgrass and whole grain products.

7. VITAMIN B6 - (pyridoxine)

DESCRIPTION: Vitamin B6 is a multi-function nutrient which promotes mental and physical health. The body is unable to store B6 so it must be replenished every day. It is soluble in both water and alcohol. It is rapidly inactivated in the presence of heat, sunlight or air. It is essential in the metabolism of tryptophan and is needed for utilization of certain other amino acids. Deficiencies could include dermatitis around the eyes and mouth, carpal tunnel syndrome, neuritis, anorexia, nausea and vomiting. It is needed for the proper absorption of Vitamin B12. It is involved in more bodily functions that any other nutrient.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Supports your immune system and mental clarity. It supports proper blood and body tissues. Promotes healthy nerves, teeth, skin and muscles. It is necessary in the production of antibodies and red blood cells and important in the metabolism and utilization of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. It is also needed for the balance of phosporus and sodium. For regulating body fluids, it balances sodium and potassium. Affects physical and mental health. It may also help for water retention. Has a role in cancer immunity, kidney stones, and arteriolsclerosis. It may reduce the symptoms of PMS and the treatment of some allergies, asthma and arthritis.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None known when taken as directed.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: Diuretics and cortisone drugs may block the absorption of vitamin B6.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa sprouts, avocados, banana, bee pollen, beef, beets, bell pepper, blackstrap molasses, Brewer's yeast, brown rice and other whole grains, buckwheat sprouts, cabbage, cantelope, carrots, chicken, corn, eggs, fish, grains, greens, lemon, meat, nutritional yeast, nuts, oats, oranges, peanuts, peas, prunes, raisins, soybeans, spinach, spirulina, all kinds of sprouts, sunflower seeds, green vegetables, wheatbran, wheatgerm, wheatgrass, whole wheat, and walnuts.

8. VITAMIN B12 - (cyanocobalamin)

DESCRIPTION: This B-vitamin can be stored in the liver and kidneys for long periods, unlike other B-vitamins that must be replenished daily. It is soluble in water or alcohol and is unstable in hot alkaline or acid solutions. A deficiency can result in pernicious anemia, malabsorption and those with digestive disorders. Deficiency symptoms may include eye disorders, abnormal gait, memory loss, and hallucinations. May be synthesized by intestinal bacteria. Vitamine B12 is available only from animal sources which is why vegetarians typically have a B12 deficiency.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Helps in the remission of pernicious anemia and is essential for normal development of red blood cells. Can be produced by the intestines. Helps support your nerve structure and aids in healthy bone marrow. Promotes growth and plays a critical role in proper energy metabolism and in immune and nerve function. Aids in iron functioning and helps the placement of Vitamin A in the body tissues. Helps all cells function normally. Necessary for the metabolism of fats, proteins and carbohydrates. Improves balance, memory and concentration. Maintains fertility and normal development and growth.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None known when taken as directed.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: None known.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa, beans, bee pollen, beef, blue cheese, cheese, clams, comfrey, dairy products, dulse, eggs, flounder, garlic, greens, herring, kelp, kidney, lentil sprouts, liver, mackeral, milk, nutritional yeast, nuts, sardines, seafood, seeds, snapper, soybeans, spirulina, all kinds of sprouts, tofu, wheatgerm, wheatgrass, white oak bark and Swiss cheese.

9. CHOLINE - (B-Complex Vitamin)

DESCRIPTION: It is important to take Vitamin B5 with choline, as this facilitates its conversion into acetylcholine. Acetylcholine plays a key role in your memory and intellect, as well as in coordination, movement, muscle contraction and the diseases associated with this such as Parkinsonism, Tardive Dyskinesia. Therefore, memory would be impaired without Choline. Choline can be produced by the body in the gastro-intestinal tract.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Supports your brain, liver, kidneys and nervous system function. Helps to maintain normal cholesterol and blood pressure. Aids in memory. Helps to prevent gallstones and to maintain muscular support. Has a role in eliminating toxins by helping the liver. Assists in lecithin formation. Aids in the metabolism of fat and cholesterol.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None known when taken as directed.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: None known.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Bean sprouts, bee pollen, cabbage, cauliflower, chickpeas, egg yolks, fruits, grains, green beans, leafy greens, lecithin, legumes, liver, meat, milk, nutritional yeast, nuts, peanuts, peas, rice, seeds, soybeans, spinach, wheat, wheat germ, wheatgrass and whole wheat.

10. Vitamin C - (Ascorbic acid)

DESCRIPTION: If you get a high-quality multivitamin, it should contain Vitamin C with bioflavonoids. The bioflavonoids and Vitamin C will work together, just like they do in nature. You may find Vitamin C often appear on labels as calcium ascorbate and/or magnesium ascorbate. The reason why is the ascorbate acid is buffered to promote digestive comfort. Not everyone can handle the same Vitamin C. Deficiencies may include lowered resistance to infections, hemorrhage, anemia, scurvy, joint tenderness, and susceptibility to dental caries, pyorrhea and bleeding gums. Vitamin C is soluble in water and is easily destroyed by oxidation and heat will hasten the process. It also gets lost in cooking, particularly if water in which the food was cooked is discarded. Vitamin C can also be easily lost if cooked in iron or copper cookware. Frozen foods lose very little of their Vitamin C. It can be stored in the body to a limited extent, unless of course you are a smoker, then it cannot be stored at all and must be supplemented in the diet.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: In high doses can cause diarrhea. Large amounts of Vitamin C may cause a false negative reading when blood in the stool is being tested.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: Make sure that you check with your doctor if you are taking aspirin, analgesics, antidepressants, anticoagulents, oral contraceptives, or steroids because they may reduce levels of Vitamin C in the body. Alcohol can also reduce Vitamin C in the body. If you are taking diabetic medications and sulfa drugs, they may not be as effective when taken with Vitamin C. Pregnant women should always check with their doctor before taking Vitamin C. If a infant becomes dependent on a Vitamin C supplement, they have a potential to develop scurvy.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa sprouts, apples, asparagus, avocados, bee pollen, beets, beet greens, berries, broccoli, brussel sprouts, burdock root, cabbage, cantaloupe, cauliflower, celery, cherries, chickweed, citrus fruits, collards, cucumber, currants, garlic, grapefruit (pink), leafy greens, green vegetables, kale, kelp, kiwi, lemons, mangos, mustard greens, onions, oranges, papayas, parsley, peas, persimmon, pineapple, potato, radishes, raw vegetables, rose hips, spinach, spirulina, all kinds of sprouts, strawberries, sweet peppers, swiss chard, tomato, turnip greens, watercress and wheatgrass. Also fruits and their juices.

11. VITAMIN D - (cholecalciferol or calciferol)

DESCRIPTION: The best way to get Vitamin D is through exposure to sunlight. Our ability to manufacture Vitamin D from sunlight decreases with age. Deficiencies of Vitamin D can interfer with the utilization of calcium and phosphorus in bone and tooth formation. It can cause irritability and weakness. When severe deficiencies are apparent, Rickets may be common especially in young children, which is Osteomalacia in adults. Vitamin D is soluble in fats and organic solvents. It is relatively stable under refrigeration and it can be stored in the liver. Vitamin D is often associated with Vitamin A. Important in treating osteoporosis, rickets and hypocalcemia while also enhancing the immune system.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: It helps to support healthy bones and calcium and phosphorus absorption from the intestinal tract. Helps to cure rickets. Supports healthy vision. Helps produce blood plasma and regulates the metabolism of minerals. It helps to stabilize heart action and the nervous system. Aids in the normal clotting of blood.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None if taken as recommended. Toxicity may occur from amounts over 65,000 I.U.'s over a period of several years. Vitamin D should not be take without calcium. Any intestinal disorders, liver or gallbladder disorders can interfer with the absorption of Vitamin D. The use of some cholesterol lowering drugs, antioxidants, hormones, mineral oil or steroids may interfer with absorption of Vitamin D. Thiazide diuretics may upset the calcium and Vitamin D ratio.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: Should be taken with Calcium

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily. Some cholesterol-lowering drugs may interfere with absorption.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa and their sprouts, avocado, bee pollen, butter, carrots, chickweed, comfrey, cod liver oil, dairy products fortified with Vitamine D, egg yolk, fish liver oils, fish having fat distributed throughout its flesh, garlic, halibut, herring, leafy greens, lemongrass, liver, mackerel, marshmellow root, milk, mushrooms, oatmeal, oysters, salmon, sardines, seeds, sunflower seeds, sweet potato, tuna, vegetable oil and yeast.

Best source is the sunlight.

12. VITAMIN E - (d-alpha tocopheryl)

DESCRIPTION: Vitamin E should be provided in a high-quality multivitamin in the form of d-alpha tocopheryl. This is necessary because the natural form of Vitamin E is identical in structure to the Vitamin E that the body produces. It will be better absorbed than a synthetic Vitamin E and will remain in your system longer to give you more of its benefits. PLEASE READ NEW RESEARCH BELOW UNDER "POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS."

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: When taking Vitamin E, a proper amount of Zinc has to be maintained in order to assist Vitamin E to do it's job. Helps prevent free radical damage. May assist in preventing age spots due to the lipid interaction. Is essential for reproduction and increases the fertility of the males and females. It may also restore male potency. In the female it will aid in lactation and fibrocystic breasts. Aids in the prevention on miscarriages. Helps promote proper cellular health, mental health, blood flow and protects red blood cells. It is great for wound healing and helps to prevent blood clots. When it supplies more oxygen to the body, the body has more endurance. Helps support the lungs from day to day environmental pollutants. Improves circulation which can help with PMS. Can help prevent scarring, healing, reduces blood pressure and may help with cataracts. Athletic performance may be improved and also leg cramps.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: NEW RESEARCH -- High Doses Increase Risk of Death From All Causes, Research Shows - By Peggy Peck - WebMD Medical News - Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD - Wednesday, November 10, 2004

Vitamin E hasn't proven to be good for the heart, and now a study suggests that too much vitamin E -- daily doses of 400 IU or more -- actually increases the risk of dying, according to new findings.

Johns Hopkins University researcher Edgar R. Miller III, MD, PhD, an associate professor of medicine, tells WebMD that when he combined 19 vitamin E studies that looked at almost 136,000 patients, "it was clear that as the vitamin E dose increased, so does all-cause mortality."

He says the risk of death starts to increase at 150 IU, but at 400 IU, which is the typical dose available in vitamin E capsules, the risk of dying from any cause is about 10% higher than for people not taking the vitamin. At megadoses, such as 2,000 IU of vitamin E, the risk increased more than 20%.

"Based on our findings, high-dose vitamin E supplementation is unjustified," he says. Vitamins, he notes, are not regulated by the FDA or other agencies, but a report in 2000 by the Institute of Medicine recommended 1,000 IU per day as the "upper tolerable limit" for vitamin E. "We recommend that the upper tolerable limit be lowered to 400 IU per day," he says. Adults get about 10 IU of vitamin E from diet, he says.

Miller presented his findings at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2004, and the study was simultaneously released online by the Annals of Internal Medicine.

'Don't Take' Vitamin E Supplements

"This is the most important story from this meeting," Raymond Gibbons, MD, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., tells WebMD. Gibbons, who served as chairman of the scientific program committee at the meeting, says he has been urging his patients to stop taking vitamin E for years.

He also says heart disease prevention guidelines say "vitamin E is 'not recommended.' It doesn't get clearer than that -- don't take it."

Studies of vitamin E supplements in people with heart disease have not shown that vitamin E is effective in preventing heart attacks or deaths.

His voice rising as he describes his frustration with patients that "don't take drugs that we know work, yet take a supplement because they heard about it on the radio or because a neighbor recommended it," Gibbons says he hopes this latest report will finally debunk the vitamin E myth.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: An iron supplement should not be taken together with Vitamin E. If you are suffering from diabetes, thyroid disorders, rheumatic heart disease or other heart ailments you SHOULD consult your physician before taking ANY Vitamin E. If you are suffering from high blood pressure should consult their physican first, also.

GENERAL USAGE: Remember, Zinc is essential to maintain proper Vitamin E levels.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa sprouts, almond, avocado, barley, been sprouts, bee pollen, broccoli, carrot, corn, cornmeal, eggs, fruit, grains, leafy greens, kelp, legumes, dessicated liver, nuts, milk, oatmeal, organ meats, olive oil, oranges, brown rice, rosehips, seeds, spinach, spirulina, all kinds of sprouts, sweet potatoes, Vegetable and nut oils, sunflower seeds, whole grains, wheat germ, and wheatgrass.

13. VITAMIN F - (Essential Fatty Acids) (EFAs)

DESCRIPTION: Essential fatty acids (EFAs) cannot be made by the body and have to be supplied through nutrients. These EFA's are also known as unsaturated fatty acids or polyunsaturated fatty acids. They are often advised to patients from doctors to lower cholesterol levels, blood pressure levels and reduce strokes and heart attacks. The most essential of all EFAs is linoleic acid. What does this mean? Your daily requirement should be 10 - 20% of your total calorie intake of the day. Primrose and Black Currant Oil contain very large amounts of linoleic acid. You can find cold deep water fish containing more Omega 3 EFAs than any other source.

Flax seed oil contains large amounts of magnesium, potassium and fiber. It is also a fantastic to provide B Vitamins, protein and zinc. Flax seed oil is Awesome!!!! It is low in saturated fats and calories (you can't beat that!) and it does not contain cholesterol. You can mix the oil with any juice or water. You can also take the flax seed oil by the tablespoon because it has a nutty taste. Some of my patients will add it to their soups, salads, cereal or yogurt. Sometimes you may hear a doctor suggest that 1 tablespoon of flax seed oil should be taken for every 75 pounds. Ask you doctor about this.

Diabetics must consult with the doctors about taking fish oil supplements because it is best that they go right to the source for their fish oils, meaning, eat the fish! EFAs can help many illnesses and conditions. Arteriolsclerosis, arthritis, blood clotting disorders, blood pressure, breast cancer, candidiasis, cholesterol and triglycerides levels, coronary heart disease, eczema, and psoriasis. EFAs are found in high concentrations in the brain. EFAs assist in nerve transmission and are needed for normal brain function.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: May assist in the reduction of weight and it provides the body with a fatty substance that can easily be metabolized. Supports healthy blood cholesterol levels, nervous system, cardiovascular health and circulatory function. Helps to nourish your immune system, skin and hair. Enhances joint function, making movement easier. Supports glandular activity, especially the thyroid and adrenal glands. Aids in blood coagulation and calcium transport to cells.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None known when taken as directed.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: None known.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Omega-6 fatty acids: almonds, avocado, bee pollen, fruits, garlic, ginger, licorice root, nuts, olive oil, oranges, parsley, peanuts, pecans, root vegetables, seeds, spinach, spirulina, all kinds of sprouts, sunflower seeds, vegetable oil, wheatgerm, wheat, wheatgrass and grains.

Omega-3 fatty acids: these are hard to find in the diet . . . deep-green vegetables and fish oils, flax see, hemp seed, pumpkin seed, canola, soybean, walnuts, wheatgerm, chia, kukui (candlenut)

14. VITAMIN K - (Phylloquinone)

DESCRIPTION: Vitamin K can be formed by natural bacteria in the intestines. This is one very Good reason to take lactobacillus acidophilus (friendly flora). Vitamin K is needed to blood clotting and may also have a role bone formation, thereby preventing osteoporosis.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Vitamin K is responsible for blood clotting. It aids in the prevention of internal bleeding, hemmorhages and aids in healing bruises. Vitamin K is vital for normal functioning of the liver, therefore Vitamin K converts glucose to glycogen. Glycogen is stored in the liver.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: Large doses can accumulate in the body and cause sweating or flushing.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: When a synthetic Vitamin K is taken in large doses during pregnancy (or the last trimester) it may result in a toxic reaction for the baby. Antibiotics also interfere with the absorption of Vitamin K because it kills the friendly flora in the body that is necessary to make Vitamin K.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Vitamin K is found in alfalfa, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, dark green leafy vegetables, egg yolks, liver, oatmeal, oats, rye, safflower, soybeans and wheat.

15. VITAMIN P - (bioflavonoids)

DESCRIPTION: Bioflavonoids are water-soluble compounds found in fruits and vegetables and destroyed by heat. They consist of hesperidin, rutin, citrin, flavones and flavonols. Bioflavonoids are essential for the proper absorption and enhancement of Vitamin C.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Works with Vitamin C to assist in connective tissue maintenance and capillaries, which is why it helps heal bruises, bleeding gums and oral herpes. It fights off free radicals to promote immune functions, fight the common cold and infections. It may help maintain healthy blood vessels walls. Helps to treat dizziness and edema. Bioflavinoids also have an antibacterial affect which promotes circulation, they stimulate bile production which can help lower cholesterol levels. It may also help aid in the treatment of cataracts.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None known when taken as directed. Extremely high doses may cause diarrhea.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: None known.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: The white skin of the citrus fruit (the pith of the citrus), apricots, blackberries, buckwheat and bilberry, burdock root, black currants, cherries, grapefruit, grapes, green tea, juniper berries, lemon, oranges, parsley, peppers, plums, prunes, and rose hips.

16. FOLIC ACID - (B-Complex Vitamin)

DESCRIPTION: A water-soluble nutrient and is easily destroyed by heat in the presence of an acid. It is especially important for women of child-bearing age to guard against neural tube defects in their children. It decreases when food is stored at a room temperature.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: None known when taken as directed. Check with your doctor if you have a hormone related cancer or a convulsive disorder. Large doses may prevent the appearance of anemia and may still permit neurological symptoms to develop.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: Oral contraceptives may increase the need for folic acid. When consuming alcohol, it may lower absorption of folic acid by the body.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa sprouts, apricots, asparagus, avocado, barley, beans, bee pollen, beef, beet greens, bran, Brewer's yeast, broccoli, brown rice, buckwheat sprouts, cantaloupe, cauliflower, citrus fruits, cheese, chickpeas, chicken, comfrey leaf, cucumber, dates, kelp, fruits, vegetables (green, leafy), lamb, lentils, liver, milk, oranges, organ meats, split peas, peas, pork, rice, root vegetables, salmon, soybeans, spinach, spirulina, all kinds of sprouts, tuna, wheatgerm, wheatgrass, whole grains, whole wheat and yeast.

17. INOSITOL - (B-Complex Vitamin)

DESCRIPTION: This is a sugar like substance found in the kidney, liver, muscle and skeleton. You can also find it in the leaves and seeds of many plants. It is a water-soluble nutrient that is usually associated with the B vitamins. Deficiencies in experimental animals have resulted in loss of hair, eye and growth problems.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Enhances circulation and intestinal health. Helps support your nervous system, cells, eyes, heart, brain and hair growth. Aids in the prevention of atherosclerosis and arteriolsclerosis. Helps to form lecithin in the body with the help of choline and assists in the metabolism of fat and cholesterol. Aids in removing fatty substances from the liver. Used in protein metabolism and in the production of RNA and DNA.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None known when taken as directed.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Alfalfa sprouts, beans, bee pollen, cabbage, cantaloupe, citrus fruit (except lemons), chickpeas, corn, echinacea, garlic, lecithin, lima beans, meats, milk, nutritional yeast, nuts, oatmeal, oats, onions, oranges, peanuts, peas, pork, raisins, rice, spirulina, sunflower seeds, veal, vegetables, wheatgerm, wheatgrass and whole-grain products.

18. PABA - (Para-aminobenzoic Acid) (B-Complex Vitamin)

DESCRIPTION: PABA is a basic component of the folic acid which will support the bodies production of folic acid. Since it acts as an antioxidant, it may help preserve the skin by protecting it from sunburn and cancer. PABA promotes the use of pantothenic acid by the body. It is also a coenzyme in various protein reactions.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS: Helps support healthy hair and hair color, skin, red blood cell formation and intestinal health. Helps to metabolize proteins.

POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: None known when taken as directed.

POTENTIAL INTERACTION: Check with your doctor if you are taking sulfa drugs because PABA may interfere with sulfa.

GENERAL USAGE: May be taken daily.

FOOD SOURCES: Bran, burdock root, brown rice, greens (leafy), horsetail, kidney, liver, unrefined molasses, molasses, nutritional yeast, sunflower seeds, wheatbran, wheatgerm, wheatgrass, whole-grain products, and yogurt.